5 things to do (and not do) to support someone with depression

“It can be very difficult to explain this alternate reality to someone who does not have mental illness. Please try to understand that rational thinking will not work because logic literally doesn’t exist in the universe we currently inhabit.”

I found this list to be very good. A quick, accessible resource for anyone looking to support a loved one living with depression. Full list is HERE

This Jarring Photo Series (and mini documentary) Captures What PTSD Really Looks Like

TW – Graphic images, suicide

These powerful images are extremely important. As one woman mentions in the short video at the bottom of the page, it’s one thing to hear a statistic but it’s another to be faced with an image. I like that each veteran had choice over how they wanted their images to look. They are so full of emotion and truth, and I am honoured by their vulnerability and strength. I feel that this conversation is important not just for those serving in the armed forces, but for police, firefighters and other first responders, as well as survivors of all forms of abuse and other traumas. It is important to shed a light on PTSD and to support those suffering. Part of that starts with education and really listening when folks share their experiences.

Find all the photos and the mini documentary HERE

Gaslighting (an introduction)

“We are supposed to be the caretakers of everyone else’s emotions. So when someone gaslights a woman, it’s a very effective means of silencing her. She looks to herself to see how she can improve, because the thought of upsetting someone she loves is distressing.”

Full piece with examples HERE