Everyone Calls Themselves An Ally, Until It’s Time To Do Some Real Ally Shit

Another great piece detailing ways to work as an ally (VERB) with communities in which you have privilege.

“Fact: you are the children and grandchildren of oppressed people who seen our lands as means to escape their own oppressive imperialistic leaders. They came and they used racism and religion as the catalyst for the wholesale slaughter of the native peoples. There is a responsibility in this knowledge to do something. More than acknowledgement and more than rallies or marches. Real tangible ways to create meaningful relationships to us and to the land is what the next step in our struggle is.”

GREAT list, in full HERE

4 Ways White People Can Work for Indigenous Justice

From truth telling to land return, check out this list of ways to act as an ally to Indigenous communities.

Full list HERE

Winnipeg – Where Canada’s Racism Problem May Be At It’s Worst

“For decades, the friendly Prairie city has been known for its smiling, lefty premiers, pacifist, Mennonite writers and a love affair with the Jets. Licence plates here bear the tag “Friendly Manitoba.” But events of last fall served to expose a darker reality. The Manitoba capital is deeply divided along ethnic lines. It manifestly does not provide equal opportunity for Aboriginals. And it is quickly becoming known for the subhuman treatment of its First Nations citizens, who suffer daily indignities and appalling violence. Winnipeg is arguably becoming Canada’s most racist city.”

Full piece with links HERE

Mountie Arrests Woman Then Releases Her Into His Own Custody

Couldn’t have said it better myself;

“How is taking a Aboriginal woman who is intoxicated to your home after arresting her as a RCMP officer the start of a “relationship”? Not only is the act horrifying, but the reporting on this shows such a lack of understanding of rape culture – where is the conversation of consent? of power? Come on CBC do better.” – Farrah Khan

Full piece HERE 

Skwachays – Aboriginal Art Hotel in Vancouver

“Skwachays is more than a good-looking boutique hotel; it has two additional functions. First, 24 units are saved for low-cost aboriginal artist housing; the lower level is being renovated into a workshop. Artists live at Skwachays on a three-year contract, during which they produce pieces that are sold in the hotel’s lobby gallery. Skwachays’ goal is to help the artists become financially independent by the end of their contract.

Second, the remaining 18 rooms are designated as the hotel, each uniquely designed by one of six aboriginal artists. These rooms, as well as the gallery sales, fund the artist housing, resulting in a self-sustaining social enterprise.

Aside from the sheer beauty of its design, hotel guests can immerse themselves in aboriginal culture by participating in a traditional sweat lodge and smudge ceremonies. All food is produced by a local aboriginal catering company, with wine and beer focusing on local offerings as well.”

Sounds AMAZING! Sign me up!
More details and breathtaking photographs HERE

Commission Finds That At Least 4000 Children Have Died in Residential Schools

**trigger warning***

“Some children died as runaways and were found frozen to death in snowy fields; others who tried to escape their abusers drowned in nearby rivers.”

commission finds at least 4000 children died in residential schools

Elsipogtog and Foundational Colonial Violence

Wonderful piece, a lot to reflect on.
“we must all organize to sustain Indigenous resistance and resurgence. Round dances, flash mobs, protests in solidarity, and other moments of resistance are just that – moments that must be connected and strung together by the chords of daily resurgences, organized and collective (re)education and struggle, and building up a new relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. This takes time, effort, and living out relationships beyond the moment of disruption. It is these lived out, sustained efforts that interrupt the sustained violence of colonialism.”

Decolonization

by Eric Ritskes

Change demands moments of crisis and conflict. In these moments of crisis, there are two options: to embrace the change and recognize the necessity of it, or to fight against it, to try and frantically batten down the hatches of the status quo. In light of the recent conflict in Elsipogtog First Nation in New Brunswick, Rex Murphy in his recent article, pulls out the dullest, bluntest hammer to flail wildly away in protection of the settler colonial status quo.

In Murphy’s article he lays out the foundations of violence inherent in the settler colonial state (while simultaneously and willfully ignoring that same violence), where he highlights the only two choices afforded Indigenous people in settler society. Each choice is as violent and potentially deadly as the other. On one side, by evoking the ‘Canadian citizenry’, Murphy is highlighting the delineation between citizens and Indigenous peoples…

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